Gentrification Boom in Rome

In Rome we find different vibes as we loiter district by district. It feels like some hotspots determine the residents, the style, the events, and even the atmosphere of a neighborhood. Ori is it the other way around? Has the low-budget fun started with Renato, or the university fellows have forced Renato to be low-budget fun? And the line hasn’t finished yet. We serve in the today’s menu Pigneto and Monti as well.

 

The hipsters’ hood

 

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Once upon a time – let’s be more accurate, still in the first part of 2014 – has existed a cult gathering place, a brilliant concert spot, and an ideal relaxing corner, which was called 2Periodico. The bar has made come true many trendy and innovative ideas, which were pretty strongly connected world-widely to the urban hippies to the wayfarer glasses, checked shirts, skateboards or city bikes. This bar was one of the first in Rome, which offered brunch. This bar had the initiative to provide some place on the walls to let the young unknown artists show their works to the public. This was the bar, which had a small stage in the heart of the city, which gave place to talented garage bands to play. 2Periodico has mysteriously closed, but the spirit has stayed. Moreover, it has infected the whole neighborhood. Despite of the fact that the vicinity of Colosseum saved the relatively high prices, but the streets are filled now with more locals, than tourists. It feels that all the hipsters have moved there, and following the rule of demand and supply, many other bars started to bloom with the atmosphere of the above mentioned one. Urbana47 with its tiny cinema has just raised the number of cultural activities, therefore “the intelligent but cool” image of the area has been absolutely proved. Pierre Le Fou and TheBlackMarket have become the hipsters’ petrol station, too.

 

What is in the wallet of a student?

 

piazzetta
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The surrounding of The Sapienza University has its own history. Even my Roman friend’s grandma knows perfectly what is San Lorenzo about. This district is actually an exciting and fun melting pot. The meeting point, which is just known as “la piazzetta” and nobody remembers its real name, gives a nice reflection of it. There you can find mad people, the most rose-sellers ever,  street artists, who have just finished their shifts, tired students, tipsy students, very drunk students, but even the local grannies. This party quartier is definitely alternative, but just slightly artisty, rather purse friendly. Surely it is suitable for the expectations of university visitors. Three things you can’t avoid in San Lollo: something outragious like the hospital designed pub, a shot for 1,5 euros and cocktails for less than 3,5 euros. If you only want to chat with your friends you can sit down in front of Renato and sip the cheapest and tastiest Mojito of the city. If you wish a bit of dancing and commercial fun, the best is to choose L’evento. If you want to rock and you need some creepy waves, let’s go to Pronto Soccorso- yep, it’s the name of the bar, I am not suggesting the closest hospital.

 

The antihipsters’ hood

 

pigneto
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Some say that the regulars of Pigneto have come from San Lorenzo. Those are the ones who got too old to study, or never felt like studying, but they are crazy for arts and quality music, and let’s admit, they are forever-drinkers. They set a sharp border between themselves and the locals of Monti. According to them, the kids of Via Leonina and Via Urbana are faking their creativity of unreasonable money. At the edge of Pigneto, you will find Circolo degli Artisti, which is still the fanciest but one of the largest party places of the area. If you go a bit deeper, you’ll find Fanfulla, which is a must-see place, if you want to feel the vibes of this district. The most efficient idea to get involved in the beauty of junkiness is to have a beer bar by bar in the mainstreet of Pigneto. 

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Mira

Mira Budafoki was born in 1992 in Budapest, Hungary. She started writing in high school, continued with publishing in Hungarian journals during her studies in communication and media at the Corvinus University of Budapest. Already in her university years she has been an enthusiast journalist, and has worked for several lifestyle and cultural magazines. Despite of living the roller-coaster in her wheelchair, only travelling gave her real ups and downs. After a long weekend in Rome she helplessly fell in love with the city, and made her way back through a serial of magical events, which have led to her first book in English (Rome as we roll it), the result of her half-year romance with the Eternal City. After this, she kept on publishing about the beautiful Italian capital at Romeing and Italian Insider. In the meantime she is supporting the assosiation of Romability, which deals with the accessible tourism in Rome.
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